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Substance use and sensation seeking moderate the relationships between childhood adversity and white matter microstructure.

thesis
posted on 2024-03-01, 00:46 authored by Chelsea SmithChelsea Smith

Adverse childhood experiences contribute to differences in substance use patterning and brain white matter development. The influence of substance use and risk factors such as sensation seeking on the relationships between childhood adversity and white matter microstructure, though, is not well understood. This work examined 1) the simple associations between substance use, sensation seeking, childhood adversity, and brain white matter, as well as 2) the moderating roles of substance use and sensation seeking across adolescence on the relationships between childhood adversity and white matter microstructure. The adversity-related differences found with substance use involvement and sensation seeking in white matter may reveal patient-specific biomarkers as indicators for increased risk for substance use under stress.

History

Institution

  • Middlebury College

Department or Program

  • Neuroscience

Degree

  • Bachelor of Arts, Honors

Academic Advisor

Zu Wei Zhai

Conditions

  • Restricted to Campus

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